Needs and tools

Background: 4th class with a group of 7 students. Last year of secondary school. Intermediate level (on the papers; in real life, pre-intermediate/high elementary). Use Spanish to communicate in class, claim they cannot speak English.

Situation: Students complain (in Spanish) that the following class will coexist with a Boca-River football match. They don’t want to attend, but they have an institutional exam.

They know I’m on Twitter. I tweet and read aloud as I write.

“We’re intelligent,” one of my students says. In English.

I tweet:

They start to have a conversation in English for the first time ever.

I don’t mean to say that you can use twitter to change your students’ attitude. This is not one of the thousand ways you can use twitter in education. What I do want to say is, keep it simple. Digital tools should help you meet your class needs. Just as a piece of chalk does. Just as the tone of your voice does.

(This post was inspired on reality + #3 and #6 here.)

En español.
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4 Comments to “Needs and tools”

  1. Interesting to think that the network didn’t have to do much to help you. Except to exist.

  2. Hadn’t noticed that. Intangible network.

  3. Wonderful.

    I’ve often thought that a teacher, ‘an audience of one’, is not a true audience and that when we give students a legitimate audience then it raises there level of concern, and thus their level of effort.

    As Claudia says, 6)’There are no how-tos.’ and I imagine that to some students in some classes, what you did could have been demoralizing, but you knew your students and used a strategy that would work for them at that point in time. That’s the intangible nature of good teaching that many don’t understand.

    Well done!

    • She’s right. What we find useful from other teachers’ experience is never the Step1 Step2 instructions. It’s always nuances, and attitudes. Strategies are always to be developed for each particular situation.
      Loved that idea of giving students a legitimate audience, had never thought about that in those terms.

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